click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130401
20130430
SHOW
Cavuto 21
Stossel 19
Book TV 17
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 162
FOXNEWSW 124
FBC 112
CSPAN 99
CNNW 98
CSPAN2 75
CNBC 56
KGO (ABC) 54
KNTV (NBC) 28
KQED (PBS) 26
KPIX (CBS) 25
CURRENT 24
KOFY 16
KRCB (PBS) 14
KTVU (FOX) 13
MSNBC 12
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1016
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,020 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the future of medicare and argues that the health care industry, more so than the public, is dependent on the $600 billion of annual medicare spending. this program is a little under an hour. >> for today is medicare and where we're headed and what it means for you and your patients. today in washington, d.c. the obama administration is preparing to release its federal budget proposal tomorrow that will have changes proposed for the medicare program. you might think, well, i'm not over 65, although some in the room may be over 65. what does medicare have to do with me? in fact, medicare has a role in the lives of all of us including residents. the president's proposal will be yet another ongoinge de o fturef medicare. both democrats and republicans have proposed raising medicare's eligibility age from 65 to 67. others have proposed that seniors buy in to the health exchanges that will be coming online during the health care reform. and others have proposed eliminating fee-for-service medicine in medicare entirely and having everyone enroll in a private insurance plan. these are proposa
with us. >> guest: thank you for being so kind. >> medicare and where we're headed and what it means for you and your patience. today in washington d.c. administration is preparing to release the budget proposal will have changes for the medicare program. you may think i am not over 65. what does medicare have to do with me? it has a role in the lives of all of us. the president's proposal is another ongoing salvo to the debate of the future of medicare. democrats and republicans have proposed raising the eligibility age from 65 up at 67. others propose coverage today. this hospital in every hospital depends on medicare for substantial portions of its revenue. for those of you residents in training you may not know medicare pays the faculty salaries, and makes residency training possible. all of us pay for medicare and we will all be covered by is a we all have it in common in the united states. here is a graph from the cbo 2007 the projected using historical trends where are we headed? in 1986 to point* 5% of gdp was just on medicare and if they continue by 2082 we will spend 25 per
institution forum on medicare. >> the fbi briefed the house intelligence committee on wednesday about the boston marathon on main. >> i tell my kids, look, if two car pulls up and one has a stranger and the other car has dick cheney, you can in the car with a stranger. >> if you you took out the money republicans spent trying to stop health care and other money trying to get health care, could have had health care. it's amazing to be in washington d.c. with all this history and amazing building and here we are at the hilton. >> it's hard to be funny with the president of the united states what cannot you, yet some in country away day in and day out, joe biden manages to do it. >> now, a brookings institution forum on medical costs. this is an hour and a half. >> at afternoon, one and all. i am though galston can a senior fellow in governance studies here at the brookings institution. i would like to begin by welcoming everyone, including our c-span audience to this discussion of options for reforming the medicare system. the importance and timeliness of this topic should be clear to e
for a very corrupt system down there. >> now a brookings institution form on making medicare or efficient and less costly. this is an hour and a half. >> good afternoon one and all. i am bill galston a senior fellow at government studies here at working since a two shin and i would like to begin by welcoming everyone, including our c-span audience to this discussion of options for reforming the medicare system. the importance and timeliness of this topic should be clear to everyone. medicare is a big piece of the health care sector which now constitutes more than one sixth of the american economy. it's a cornerstone of security for tens of millions of americans. the growth of this program which will only accelerate as more and more baby boomers retire as a prime driver of our long-term fiscal challenges. there is a wide debate as to whether this lower rate of growth in recent years means we have finally turned the corner or rather will begin to accelerate again as we continue to recover from the great recession. to explore these issues and possible responses to them, we have, i'm delighte
about medicaid and medicare which obama care has apparently not accomplished. host: what does a grand bargain look like to you? guest: spending cuts. that will be on medicaid and ked care and the social security side s. entitlements, that's the bargain. we've shown through sequestration that appropriations, defense, domestic spending can be cut or at least will be cut. what we haven't shown is any willing tons combine tax increases and entitlement cuts in a meaningful way. the president says he wants it. it's hard for me to see how the politics have change sod much that because someone wants it it will happen. host: what are the odds a grand bargain happens? >> much less than 50/50. guest: if you look at the chairman of the budget committee and the chairman of the house budget committee and what they are proposing, i view them as a group together that e bline to facts and deaf to reason. the democrats believe we don't have to do something about social security and medicare and medicaid and you can trim them here and there but they are not growing at an unsustainable rate. if you look
changes to social security and medicare. >> senior director of economic policy project at the bipartisan policy center. thank you for being here this morning. president obama unveiled his 2014 budget this week. when we look at social security and medicare, called entitlement. is the obama budget this year very different than the past budget? >> guest: not in health care programs like medicare and medicaid. i think he deserves a great deal of credit for attempting to take on what's been called the -- politics namely social security. there's something called a consumer price index, and accurate measurement called the changed cpi. what that mean; however, instead of getting the 2.2 increase in social security check or retirement check from the federal government. you might only get 1.9% increase. we tried this twenty five years ago in 1986, it probably cost the republicans of the united states the election and hasn't been tried since. he deserves great credit if for nothing else but the single act of touching the. >> host: if you would like to talk with steve bell here are the numbers. our
to medicaid reform, saying we were in reduce medicare inflation rates by 2%. >> i want to say in an earlier conversation, we ran out of time. the situation is supportive of waivers, demonstrations to improve medicaid like any health system, but we do have to recognize the importance of medicaid for a vulnerable population. >> incentivizing the state like the president is doing as a smart way to get savings and make sure states have the flexibility like you indicated. does the president reduce national deficits by entertaining medicare reforms that rely on the voucher? it is a voucher program because if it quacks like a duck is a duck, the voucher program however you slice it shows two thirds of the cost to seniors that can afford being on fixed-income. >> the president budget has sensible reforms to medicare that maintains the program. >> isn't it true economists block deficits to actually be manageable given the state of the country's economy that abruptly balancing the budget in a short window like republicans actually as harmful to the recovery and cause problems and cuts jobs? >> we tal
for this committee is to act now, to save medicare, so that every generation of seniors can count on it. so i welcome to inclusion of reforms to medicare, including paying local doctors fairly so they can continue to treat our seniors, and improvements to the current medicare structure. however, the president's budget falls far short of what is needed to save medicare. its trustees tell us this important program is going broke sooner rather than later. the white house and congress need to act together now. this year, to save medicare for the long-term. i challenge you to save medicare for its own sake. not conditioned upon tax increases from hard-working americans to has nothing to do with medicare. this committee will act at the direction of chairman camp. we will examine bipartisan solutions to save medicare. some supported by the president. i invite you to enjoy this committee in working toward long-overdue actions that protect and improve medicare. both republicans and democrats connect three that americans the the -- both republicans and democrats can agree that americans need reform that lowers
are paying for this. >> cancer drug costs for some medicare patients and that is blamed on the sequester. >> it is not obama care, of course not. but it is the sequester. see, it is not obama care. you cancer patients are being turned away from treatment because of the sequester. because of the republicans. the republicans had nothing to do with denying cancer are patients treatment. the republicao the sequester. it was a barack obama idea. >> greta: first tonight the federal government planning to hire thousands of navigators. and no, not the lincoln suvs but you more hugh you mans for the fed -- humans for the federal payroll. because obama care is so confusing that people can't figure it out on their own. and get this, the state of california is asking for 2,000 navigators, the human kind that could cost taxpayers up to $2 billion and that is just for one state for one year. pat buchanan joins us. we need navigators. >> this is astounding. nancy pelosi was right. we had to pass it before we he could find out what was in it. if there is 21,000 of these navigators for california that tr
number of medicare beneficiaries ever involved in the program and yet we're on historic low in spending. .4% in 2012. never been seen before and as congressman kind said, the c.b.o. reconfigured their projections into the future years. so i think the president's budget captures the negotiation that there are very effective strategies that deliver appropriate care, make sure that we take seniors' needs into account. we continue to update quality programs, at the same time constrain the costs into the future. >> all right, thank you. mr. ryan is recognized. thank you. >> i guess i should pick up where mrs. sanchez left off. the difference in our budget approaches were we make sure all of the medicare money stays in medicare. chief actuary of c.m.s. was here just a year ago saying you can't spend the same dollar twice. you can't on the one hand count savings from medicare to pay for obama care and count it as savings to medicare. he even went so far to put appendix in the report to that effect. the other point is in our budget we put a reserve fund, which is a budgetary mechanism to addres
and the value in what we are paying. pacific lay, i would like to focus on the value of medicare and medicaid. this touches the lives of more than 100 million americans, one in every three citizens. i also want to examine the progress the administration has it isn implementing -- implemented correctly, more americans will gain access to health care next year as result the law. news programs fall under the purview of our witnesses and in sibelius. am sure you're are quite busy, madam secretary. in 167 days millions of americans will begin enrolling in health insurance plan submission marketplace. time is short. we need to use each of these days to make sure the marketplaces are up and running, ready to help uninsured americans axis affordable coverage. the present budget request a total of $5.2 billion for program management at the centers for medicare and medicaid services. of this, $1.5 billion would we to establish health insurance marketplaces. i am concerned that not every state, including montana, would have an insurance marketplace established in time. the moneyow how requested would be
10 years for medicare. and other health programs. the chairman of the committee, dave camp of michigan is in the room. this is live coverage here on c-span. [inaudible conversations] >> here on c-span2 while we wait for the committee to gavel in, the health and human sophists service committee katherine fu senator tester, we will show you the comments of john boehner from wednesday as the president's budget was released. >> while the president has backtracked on some of his entitlement reforms, and conversations we have, he does deserve some credit for some incremental entitlement reforms. he has outlined in his budget, but i would hope that he would not hold hostage the modest reforms for his demand for bigger tax hikes. why don't we do what we can agree to do? why do we find the common ground that we do have and move on that? the president got a tax hike in january, we don't need to be raising taxes on the american people. so i'm hopeful in the coming weeks, we'll have an opportunity to the budget process to come to some agreement. >> good morning. finally, the president
affect the spending on things like social security and medicare and lots of different programs. so we interpret this as more like an olive branch, meaning a good thing from the perspective that he's willing to put something on the table that's controversial. we've never proposed it before. our proposals have always been don't deal or touch currency, reform the programs for younger generations so that they can have these programs when they retire so they don't go bankrupt, while making sure current seniors don't have changes. current seniors and reflects reforms to the next generation. it's a different approach but at the very least he's putting something on the table that he intends to be an olive bran and i see that as a good thing. >> and the change the cpi, we are almost a little sloppy and call it cutting social security benefits. >> no. >> it's really how much does it grow so you keep the same sort of buying power? >> that's right. it's a more accurate measurement of inflation adored to go tad decisions and economists. it's a proposal that has been around for a number of years. p
to consider the nomination of marilyn tavenner to serve as administrator for the centers for medicare and medicaid services, cms. this is a critical agency for a number of reasons has been without a confirmed administrator since the fall of 2006. cms is the world's largest health insurer. and has a budget of nearly $1 trillion processes over 1.2 billion claims a year or services provided to some of our nation's most vulnerable citizens receiving medicare and medicaid. if confirmed, ms. tavenner, you'll have a daunting challenge ahead of you. while i believe you have the qualifications to do the job, there is still much that you will need to do in order to assure members of this committee that cms is heading in the right direction and that your leadership will help steer the agency through the very turbulent times that lie ahead. one of the greatest challenges facing cms in the near future is implementation of the federal and state-based health insurance exchanges. in a speech last june, you said that the health care changes quote keep you up at night, unquote. i can relate to the. the
... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare supplement plan might be best for you. there's a wide
back. he may not take medicare and change the insurance he takes. >> let me help you avoid the land minings. if you are a baby boomer. line up your internist and card yottle if you are healthy. if you wait until you turn squiff and get on medicare, you will not find a doctor to take you on as a new patient. >> judge mathis: why not? >> this law. i read this law so you don't have. over hamp of this law is paid for with cut to medicare and doctors will be paid less to take care of seniors than any other patient . if you are a senior, brace yourself for less care for the same reason because of the cuts. energy you may not only lose your doctor but have trouble finding a hospital willing to take care of you. richarder who works for the president warned that some hospitals will stop accepting medicare because the payments will be so low. >> a lot of these comes becomes because of the independent payment advisory board . that will tell your doctor and medicare what they can. >> mike: this is cover this is not. who is on that board? >> who is by. hhs poom. >> i not practicing physician. th
of medicare patients. they are blaming the sequester budget cuts. my next guest decided his clinic wouldn't see one-third of its 16,000 medicare patients who need these drugs. here's chief executive of north shore hematology in new york. can you explain really simply how it is that you have to tell one-third of your medicare patient whose need these cancer drugs that they can't be serviced by you medically any more? >> well, we certainly aren't going to abandon them. what our discussion with the patients has been and it's been ongoing since we found out about these cuts is that while we'll continue to care for them as their physicians we won't be able to treat them with the chemotherapy agents in our office and have to write orders for it home to receive it in a local hospital. >> why is that? >> the way the reimbursement for the chemotherapy drugs is computated, the sequester cuts on about a third of them have put the reimbursement for medicare under water and we just can't -- >> can i translate that into you buy the drug, you're supposed to get paid back by the government but they don't
their story publicly on monday. carter evans, cbs news, los angeles. >> axelrod: later, medicare patients have their chemoaffected by the sequester. the 14-year-old golfer who is the talk of the masters. and in texas, a high-profile arrest of a formerti oshen the cbs evening news continues. in nearly a year, former egyptian president hosni mubarak appeared in public today. mubarak sat up in the prisoner cage inside a cairo courtroom. he faces charges related to the killing of pro-democracy demonstrators two years another but today, the judge in the case recused himself with no explanation, halting the trial. now to texas where investigators in kaufman, 30 miles south of dallas, have been looking into the murders of a district attorney and his wife as well as another top prosecutor. this morning, eric williams, a former justice of the peace, was arrested after his home was searched, but he's not being called a suspect in the murders. senior correspondent john miller is here to help us sort this all out. john what, is going on here? >> reporter: so what is going on is they've shifted their view
of the core things that our government needs to do if we want to keep medicare working as well as it has, and we want to preserve the ironclad guarantee that medicare represents, then we're going to have to make some changes. but they don't have to be drastic ones. and instead of making drastic ones later, what we should be doing is making some manageable ones now. the reforms i'm proposing will strengthen medicare for future generations without undermining that ironclad guarantee that medicare represents. we'll reduce our government's medicare bills by finding new ways to reduce the cost of health care, not by shifting the costs to seniors or the poor or families with disabilities. there are reforms that keeps the promise we made to our seniors, basic security that's rock solid and dependable and there for you when you need it. that's what my budget represents. my budget does also contain the compromise i offered speaker boehner at the end of last year, including reforms championed by republican leaders in congress. and i don't believe that all these ideas are optimal, but i'm willing t
hill as senators kick off an extended period of debate over gun legislation. >> brown: then, medicare and social security face changes in the president's new budget. we debate the potential impact. >> woodruff: education correspondent john merrow reports on a rise in high school graduation rates, but the numbers raise questions and educators search for new ways to inspire kids to succeed. >> for kids to believe school is going to lead them somewhere you have to have really strong pathways to adult success, so some could lead the college, some could lead to really solid job training opportunities that lead to a job. >> brown: we look at a clinical trial designed to stud premature baes, t that allegedly failed to disclose risks of death and blindness. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks to the author of a new book that tracks the history of political power as it becomes harder to use and even harder to keep. >> we've seen a lot of democracies are choking in checks and balances. therefore too many constraints that don't let governments govern. >> brown: and we close with the story of an army c
on the newshour: taking on social security and medicare; a rise in high school graduation rates; questions about a clinical trial involving infants; the challenge of keeping political power; and the story of a heroic wartime priest. first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a bipartisan group of senators wrapped up work today on the major elements of an immigration reform bill. that came after they agreed on a new farm worker program and visas for high-tech workers. the broader bill aims to improve border security and put 11 million people on a path to citizenship. it could be introduced on tuesday, once senate staffers complete drafts of the legislation. a wide swath of severe weather has moved eastward, already blamed for killing at least two people. the system stretched all the way from texas to michigan and brought everything from tornadoes to ice and snow. at least one large funnel cloud ripped through eastern mississippi today. authorities reported one death and numerous injuries and damage. last night, multiple twisters struck in eastern missouri, damaging
medicare advantage. bertha coombs is here to tell us about it. it's a complicated issue. >> well, it's a private insurance and medicare does reimburse those insurers. more than 15 million -- 14 million seniors buy those from insurers. they're popular. to get the extra coverage beyond medicare itself. cms the health department's center for medicaid and medicare services said that the growth rate for reimbursing the insurers in 2014 is going to be over 3%. a big reversal from their proposal last month that would have cut medicare advantage rates by more than 2%. they based that reversal in part because of a statutory medicare rule that normally cuts doctor reimbursement rates. next year it would be a cut of more than 20%. but the doctor rate reimbursement cuts which most people in medicare watch very carefully never happened. for ten years congress has instituted the doc fix. after heavy lobbying from insurers and members of congress and from both sides of the aisles and seniors themselves, cms today said it is setting plan growth at 3.3% instead, they're assuming that there will be no
. youen -- you in a little bit. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for genera
after seniors the way he has done on obamacare, taking $700 million out of medicare to put into obamacare and comes at seniors again, i think you're crossing the line to denying seniors access to health care. cenk: he hasn't gotten his talking points yet. boehner wanted to straighten him out, saying wait, wait, we love cutting social security the. >> i made it clear that i disagree with what chairman walden said. this is the least we must do to begin to solve the problems of social security. cenk: all right let me go to my panel here. lee, i thought that before the i elections, everybody talked about how they're the ones that are going to protect social security and medicare. what's fascinating is after the elections, most of them seem to agree, no, no, no, we were just kidding or lying let's slash social security and medicare. cenk: president obama was explicit in protecting medicare and social security, making it a campaign theme in 2008 and 2012, so there's huge hypocrisy there. i want to push back on the claims by a lot of progressives that speaker boehner is going to e
beginning. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations... and provided by unitedhe
ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare supplement plan might be best for you. there's a wide range to choose from. we
for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations... and provided by unitedhealthcare insurance company, which has o
media sites. >> president obama's nominee to lead the centers for medicare and medicaid services testified at a confirmation hearing before the senate on tuesday. marilyn tavenner is probably the acting medicare and medicaid administrator. she has worked as virginia's health and human services secretary. this is two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. douglas macarthur once said, a true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. testifying before today is marilyn tavenner, nominated to be the administrator of the centers for medicare and medicaid services, otherwise known as cms. ms. tavenner, you are being asked to draw on years of extensive expense to lead this agency and administer programs upon which millions of americans rely. you will surely need confidence, courage, and compassion in this role. ahead of cms has a great responsibility. cms administers health coverage to roughly one in three americans. that includes 50 million medicare patients, 56 million medicaid patients and mor
out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare supplement plan might be best for you. there's a wide range to choose from. we love to travel -- and there's s
. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations... and provided by unitedhealthcare insurance company, which has over 30 years of experience behind it. call today. remember, medicare supplement insurance helps cover some
year, right? >> yeah. i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare supplement plan might be best for you. there's a wide range to choose from. we love to travel -- and there's so much more to see. so we found a
into medicare. why? >> you know what? i think that we're looking at an economy that has become so difficult for so many people that this is the situation you're left with. i want to go back to the point made earlier about the fact that there is a total disconnect right now between the fortunes of companies and the fortunes of workers. i think what you're seeing and talking about here is part of that. you know, i don't think disability is a scam. i know that is something that's been discussed before. i think people are really struggling right now and i think that we're in this very bifurcated, schizophrenic economy in which you've got the markets way up here and you've got unemployment there. this is a result of that. >> i do not believe, matthew, that disability is a scam either. okay? but there was a fantastic article a few days ago done by npr along with the radio piece dhe that really got into the issue of disability. they interviewed people who basically said i can't get a job. i'll probably never have a job again. this is the only way that i can get money for my family. >> absolutely.
to find their military spending equals ours. >> growth in social security and medicare. someone will have to pay the bill. that bill is based on all of us. through our taxes and payroll, as ashley payroll taxes for social security and medicare. those programs are the most significant spending problems. they dwarf any problems we may dream of with regards to food stamps, housing assistance, welfare, osha will support, -- social support, the scapegoats for federal government problems. >> the federal government budget is like a federal -- family budget is that it goes up on small things like groceries. and the federal government, cutting back the mall things will make a difference and pr ograms. if you could cut spending from the overfunded programs, which programs would you redirect the money to? >> take it away from military ending and invest it in the nations infrastructure, roads, transportation networks, and in education. >> none. [laughter] i would cut spending to cut spending. toould not redirect it underfunded programs. we do not have that luxury. >> we cannot keep looking our childr
$618 billion. defense takes $624 billion. $860 billion goes to social security. medicare takes $524 billion. medicare takes another $304 billion. $223est on the debt, billion. when you look at three different budgets that have passed, you can see president obama's budget, total spending over the next 10 years, $46.50 trillion. the same as the democrats, $41.70 trillion. $41.70 trillion. total revenue over 10 years, 41.2 trillion for the house. -- projected federal 19.0 trillion. those are some of the top line figures on the budget. we will try to break those down as we go through this morning's show. right now, we are taking your calls on the gun-control bill. i think too much of the the misuse of the issue of gun violence for gun making and we are whole issue is too complicated as far as gun control. they should pass it to the police department and let them handle it. he will have to get a permit from the police department. they are the ones who have all of the insight as far as trouble from a person who is trying to seek a gun or who has problems of this nature. host: today, one o
costs for medicare is 3% and the administrative cost of insurance companies is 25%. why do republicans oppose medicare? have you read healing america:a global quest for better, cheaper and fairer health care? >> guest: i have not read that book. let's talk about what the statistics are. medicare quotes 3% because of 3% on administration but that doesn't count the 14% that is fair. the average private insurance industry company has less than 3% and there's even 25%, close to 70%. so when you look on a net-net basis medicare actually the cost of administration and the cost of everything associated with it which has shifted to the provider in medicare which has not shifted necessarily private insurance. there's not a great deal of difference so they absorb their costs. we don't count fraud in the costs of medicare. you can play games with numbers all you want. what i know is this medicare system we have today undermines the ability to create pressure on the provider to be responsible with the money. there's no penalty if i am not. come to me as a doctor there is nothing if i don't spend t
. why? when medicare was started, it was projected to be about 12 billion dollars cost in 1990. instead, in 1990, it was 107 billion dollars. like every other government program, whether it's built in a parking lot at the kennedy center or the big dig, the cost overruns are massive. they always underestimate it. there's so much red tape and inefficiency and government. people think that we're going be to be saving money with health care, it might bankrupt of country and all of those people uncovered, they'll still be uncovered. >> the thing though, tobin, it tackled the problems and they're all still there. right? >> and we've railed on obamacare for a long time, but honestly, honestly. we're curing the problem that doesn't exist. the problem is, 10,000 baby boomers every day turn 65. they have paid be collectively for every dollar they put into medicare they're going to take out $3. we know that, it's a fact and even president obama talked about this week. if you're going to try to stop the health care problem and you were to do it by these, sort of various cuts in medicare, they have
according to our projections would eradicate the shortfall for medicare. so i guess i would stop there since i affect social security and medicare. i don't want to really brag or anything. i had a few vote to support my ideas but we didn't get any support from democrats on my ideas. i try to talk to someone who i thought might discuss the issue. their main complaint was that obamacare got rid of four congressman we are no longer part of the federal health care and play program and is a question whether not it needs to go into some kind of exchange like obamacare. they said we couldn't do it because we are getting rid of the one part of government that actually works, the employee health care plans. i will stop there and i will be happy to answer questions. >> a larger than usual turnout in one reason is there is a potential presidential contender for 2016. what are you thinking on that possibility? >> i want you be part of the national debate so whether run or not being considered as something that allows me to have a larger microphone. we will continue to travel to the early primary states.
in medicare, and some $230 billion from social security. mostly by changing the way inflation is measured to determine benefit levels. the president's budget would also raise around $800 billion in new taxes including $154 billion from the wealthiest americans. $123 billion by changing medicare rebates from farm suit tall firms and another $78 billion from cigarette sales. but the biggest issue is seniors seniors, and most people's with aging parents, is the president's offer to cut social security. >> very month independent senator bernie sanders didn't like it. >> they're walking down a perilous political path. >> john: tell us what is on your mind. social security and medicare are the two most successful anti-poverty programs in american history. meanwhile, tea party cosy senator ted cruz of texas may be sort of kind of likes parts of the president's plan. he told politico. >> i'm encouraged by any steps president obama is taking to save and preserve social security and medicare by cutting it. even speaker john boehner found something maybe kind of sort of nice to say coupled with a w
. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations... and provided by unitedhealthca
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,020 (some duplicates have been removed)